Master GSS 101 Schedule of Readings

{Click a link below to jump to that week’s reading assignments}

Weekly Schedule

8/22  WEEK 1: Sex and Gender
8/29 WEEK 2: Sexuality
9/5 WEEK 3: Early Theories of Gender Difference and Proto-Feminisms
9/12 WEEK 4: The First Wave
9/19 WEEK 5: The Second Wave
9/26 WEEK 6: The Gay Rights’ Movement and the Third Wave
10/3 WEEK 7: Intersectionality, Black, and Chicana Feminisms
10/17 WEEK 8: Intersections of Bodies, Genders and Sexualities
10/24 WEEK 9: Global Perspectives
10/31 WEEK 10: Health and Reproduction
11/7 WEEK 11: Work
11/14 WEEK 12: Family
11/28 WEEK 13: The Meaning of Marriage
12/5 WEEK 14: (Post)colonialism, Racism, and Violence

Link to folder with all PDFs

8/22 WEEKS 1-3: Born this Way? Sex, Gender, and Sexuality

Sex and Gender [ISABEL: Please add links to sub-sections of major units that span several weeks]

Key Questions and Terms [KQ&T]: What is gender? What is transgender? How has gender been constructed socially over time? How do media, images, texts contruct gender? How do gender and transgender intersect with race and class and sexuality?

Three to Infinity: Beyond Two Genders (2015). [Library will purchase]

Suggested assignment: The documentary challenges the beliefs that the vast majority of people, including allies, have about gender. Use Socrative to reveal areas of ignorance without students feeling personally attacked. The goal is to demonstrate that these issues are complicated, but there are areas of consensus (as well as tension) in not only in how scholars of gender understand it, but also in how communities experience it. Consider having a gender expert colleague visit class this day if you feel you are not up to date with developments in gender expression and academic thought on it.

Intersexion https://davidson.kanopystreaming.com/video/intersexion

Kate Bornstein, selections from My Gender Workbook: How to Become a Real Man, a Real Woman, the Real You, or Something Else Entirely (1997) [Read up to p. 18 and complete the quiz, not to turn in, for yourself.]

Judith Lorber, “’Night to His Day’: The Social Construction of Gender”*

C.J. Pascoe, “Dude, You’re a Fag!”*

Rebecca Jordan-Young, Selections from BrainStorm: The Flaws in the Science of Sex Differences*

From Barker and Scheele, Queer: A Graphic History: Judith Butler; The Category of Women; What Butler Saw

Plus a selection of videos to teach Butler’s revision of the paradigm that sex determines to argue that gender determines our view of biological sex (will be revisited in later unit on science studies):

An illustrated introduction to Butler’s Gender Trouble

Butler on how discourse creates homosexuality

Butler on how your behavior creates your gender

Sexuality

KQ: What is sexuality? When and how were the words and concepts homo- and heterosexuality invented?  What is the relationship between capitalism and the ways that our lives and identities are organized? What is “compulsory heterosexuality” (Adrienne Rich)? What is “heteronormativity” (Lauren Berlant and Michael Warner)?

Jump back to weekly scheduled readings

Teach the concepts of “compulsory heterosexuality” (Adrienne Rich) and “heteronormativity” (Lauren Berlant and Michael Warner) with a PowerPoint and/or readings*

From Barker and Scheele, Queer: A Graphic History: Rich’s Compulsory Heterosexuality; (De)Constructing Compulsory Heterosexuality; Heteronormativity; Heteronormativity, Homophobia, and Heterosexism; Oh My!)*

Jonathan Ned Katz, selections from The Invention of Heterosexuality (1995)*

Companion pages to Katz from Queer: A Graphic History (The Early Sexologists, Open and Closed Doors: Early Sexological Understandings)

Suzanna Danuta Walters, “You Say Nature, I Say Nurture…Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off”*

Decker, The Invisible Orientation: An Introduction to Asexuality, intro & Part 1*

Leila Rupp, “Toward a Global History of Same-Sex Sexuality” (2001) [Read to extract the key argument and three key examples of same-sex sexuality across time and place that strike you as important and/or relate to other readings.]*

9/5  WEEKS 4-6: What is Feminism?

The First Wave in a Global Framework

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions” (1848)*

Sojourner Truth, “Two Speeches” (1851, 1867)*

Anna Julia Cooper, selections from A Voice from the South (1892)*

Hewitt, Nancy A. “Re-Rooting American Women’s Activism:Global Perspectives on 1848” (2001)*

Luisa Capetillo, selections from A Nation of Women (1910s) and her bio

Committee on the Status of Women in India, “Towards Equality” (India, 1974)

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

Second Wave Feminism and its Discontents

Friedan, selections from Feminine Mystique (1963)*

bell hooks, “Black Women Shaping Feminist Theory” in Feminist Theory from Margin to Center (1984)*

Simone de Beauvoir, selections from The Second Sex (1949)

Carol Hanisch, “The Personal is Political” (1969)

Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, selections from Our Bodies, Our Selves (1971)

Peruse the contemporary Our Bodies site as well

***

Audre Lorde, “The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House” (1979)*

Combahee River Collective: A Black Feminist Statement” (1977)*

Gloria Anzaldúa, “La Conciencia de la Mestiza: Toward a New Consciousness” (1987)*

***

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

The Third Wave and Intersectionality

Poetry and short stories by Cherríe Moraga, Nellie Wong, Mary Hope Lee, Rosario Morales, Chrystos, and Naomi Littlebear from This Bridge Called My Back, edited by Gloria Anzaldúa and Cherríe Moraga (1981)*

Patricia Hill Collins, “Controlling Images and Black Women’s Oppression” (1991)*

Kimberlé Crenshaw, “Why Intersectionality Cannot Wait” (2015) [Also read the “primer” on intersectionality linked to at the beginning of the short article]*

Website on Georgia Douglas Johnson by Davidson students, page on intersectionality.

Susan Faludi, “Blame It on Feminism” (1991)

Kathleen Hanna, “Riot Grrl Manifesto” (1991) [Look up images related to 1990s Riot Grrrl culture]

Amy Richards and Jennifer Baumgardner The Thirteen Point Agenda from Manifesta (2000)

Michelle Jensen, Review of Baumgardner & Richards, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future (2000)

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

 

WEEKS 7-8: The Birth of Gay Rights and Queer Theory

Key Questions and Terms: How do the readings demonstrate a split between more radical, anti-capitalist gay liberationist thought and activism that was more focused on creating safety for LGBTQ people via assimilation and pro-business policies (e.g. gay-owned bars)? How does Gould define the “heroic narrative” that emerged out of the “emotional habitus” of the early AIDs crisis and how did it impact activism? How do we explain the erasure of the more radical elements of early gay liberationist thought from contemporary mainstream LGBTQ activism, especially when factoring in Gould’s arguments? How does Gould help us understand contemporary gay respectability politics?

Watch CBS’ documentary The Homosexuals (1967) (43 mins)*

Documents from the 1969 Furor. [Early gay liberation flyers and manifestos, and

the emergence of the Gay Liberation Front in July 1969.]

Pat Parker, “For Straight Folks Who Don’t Mind Gays But Wish They Weren’t So Blatant – Pat Parker” (1976)

How to Survive a Plague (2012)* [On Netflix or library can purchase]

Deborah Gould, selections from Moving Politics: Emotion and ACT UPs Fight Against Aids (2009) [selections must be made from this larger reading]*

Anonymous, “Queers Read This” (1990)*

Barker and Scheele, Queer: A Graphic History, pp. 10-54

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

 

WEEKS 9-11: Bodies, Rights, and Privileges

Key Questions & Terms: What have GSS scholars revealed about the ways that scientific studies can and do unthinkingly reproduce social biases about gender and sexuality?

Privilege

Video of Butler

Eli Clare, selections from Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness and Liberation (1999)

Everyday Feminism, 3 Unethical Ways Medical and Nursing Students Are Taught to Do Pelvic Exams

Adonis Complex

Abortion

Jael Silliman et al., “Women of Color and Their Struggle for Reproductive Justice” (2004)

Watch When Abortion Illegal (28 mins)

Watch The Business of Being Born (2008), documentary about how childbirth is medicalized in the US and  Trapped (2016) documentary on the laws restricting access to abortions. [Both available on Netflix]

WEEKS 12 and 13: Feminist/Queer/Trans Ways of Knowing

Emily Martin, “The Egg and the Sperm: How Science has constructed a Romance Based on Stereotypical Male-Female Roles” (1991)

Noël Sturgeon, “Penguin Family Values: The Nature of Planetary Environmental Justice” (2010)

Bring back to Butler

 

Last names A-N read and be prepared to explain: Kenyan Farrow “Is Gay Marriage Anti-Black?”

Last names M-Z read and be prepared to explain: Marlon M. Bailey, Priya Kandaswamy, Mattie Udora Richardson “Is Gay Marriage Racist?”

Nancy Polikoff, selections from Beyond (Gay and Straight) Marriage: Valuing All Families under the Law   (2008) [Skim the Intro. and read Chapter 1 pp. 11-33]

Stephanie Coontz, selections from Marriage, a History: How Love Conquered Marriage [a longer reading, but easy to get through quickly, as it’s far from dense.]

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

 

 

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

Monday

Jean Kilbourne, TED Talk on Killing Us Softly IV: Advertising Images of Women (2014) 15 minutes

Marilyn Wann, foreward t0 The Fat Studies Reader (2009)

Deb Burgard, “What is Health at Every Size?” (2014)

Jen Baker, TEDx Talk on Complete and Total Body Love (2014) 16 minutes

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

 

Lila Abu-Lughod, “Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving? Anthropological Reflections on Cultural Relativism and Its Others” (2002)

Uma Narayan, “Contesting Cultures: Westernization, Respect for Cultures and Third World Women” (1997)

Watch 13th on Netflix. [As you watch the full-length documentary, think about how a GSS critical lens may have taken the documentary narrative in new directions.]

Elias Walker Vitulli, “Queering the Carceral” [As you read the review essay, think about its form, and what it might teach you about approaching your own Lit Review. Also, revisit the question of how a GSS critical lens may have taken the documentary narrative in new directions.]

 

10/31 WEEK 10: Health and Reproduction 

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

Monday

Jael Silliman et al., “Women of Color and Their Struggle for Reproductive Justice” (2004)

Wendy Hussey, “Slivers of the Journey: Using Photovoice and Storytelling to Examine FTM Experiences of Health Care Access” (2006) [Instead of reading from beginning to end, skim this article enough to extract: the argument; the discipline(s); the type of evidence; three key examples of such evidence; and the conclusion.]

 

 

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

 

Noël Sturgeon, “Penguin Family Values: The Nature of Planetary Environmental Justice” (2010)

 

11/28 WEEK 13: The Meaning of Marriage 

(Jump back to weekly scheduled readings)

Monday

Michael Warner, selections from The Trouble with Normal (1999)

Nancy Polikoff, selections from Beyond (Gay and Straight) Marriage: Valuing All Families under the Law   (2008) [Skim the Intro. and read Chapter 1 pp. 11-33]

[Optional] Elizabeth Freeman, selections from The Wedding Complex: Forms of Belonging in in Modern American     Culture (2002)

 

Wednesday

Kenyan Farrow “Is Gay Marriage Anti-Black?”

Marlon M. Bailey, Priya Kandaswamy, Mattie Udora Richardson “Is Gay Marriage Racist?”